Tiny Ned was found by the docks in Grimsby, completely alone and only six weeks old.

The poor thing was rushed to our nearby animal hospital. Caked in dirt and terribly skinny, Ned was in such a state that during the health check all pets get when they arrive, our vet thought the frail kitten was a boy.

In fact, it turned out that “Ned” is actually a girl. That shows what a terrible state poor Ned was in.

Ned when he was at centre and poorly
Ned was so poorly when she arrived at Blue Cross that we weren't sure if she would make it.

Her beautiful white fur was yellow with filth, she was suffering from potentially deadly cat flu and had an upset tummy that stopped her from taking on vital nutrition. She was clinging to life with what little energy was left in her.

Ned needed nursing around the clock so she was transferred from the hospital to our Cambridge rehoming centre.

We cleaned Ned up, gave her medicine every few hours and filled her pen with teddies she could snuggle up to for comfort at night.

Ned looking at camera while being cuddled by member of staff
But with round the clock TLC, Ned made a full recovery.

As well as lots of cuddles, regular meals of special kitten food and milk filled her hungry tummy.

Slowly but surely, Ned started to turn the corner. Her skinny body started to put on weight, her confidence grew and she started learning how to play. She’d chase a ball or swipe at a fishing rod toy, then when she got tired she’d snuggle up for a cuddle.

Once she recovered it was no surprise that such a sweet, playful character quickly found a new home, where she is now known as Phasma.

Pauline Ranner, Veterinary Supervisor at Cambridge, said: “It was so rewarding to nurse her back to good health, as she was so ill to start with. We were so worried about her, but with all our care and love, and her strength, she pulled through and is now happy in her new home.”

Ned lying down looking at camera

— Page last updated 18/12/2019