Spring plants poisonous to dogs

They may look pretty, but some spring flowers and bulbs are toxic to dogs. Although cases of poisoning are very rare, it's important to keep them well out of reach of your dog's reach, particularly if they like to chew or dig in the garden.

 

What spring bulbs or flowers are poisonous to dogs?

Daffodils are poisonous to dogs if they eat the bulbs or flowers, or drink water from a vase with daffodils in.

Daffodils are poisonous if eaten.

They can give your dog an upset stomach, make them vomit, and make them very sleepy and wobbly. A dog that’s been poisoned by daffodils might also have fits.

Tulips can irritate your dog’s mouth and gastrointestinal tract. Normally they will only experience drooling, being sick and diarrhoea, but heart problems and difficulty breathing are also signs of tulip poisoning.

Other plants, flowers, fruit and vegetables listed below are poisonous to dogs. Those in bold are potentially fatal, so please take care to avoid these:

  • Apples (pips)
  • Apricots (kernel)
  • Azalea
  • Bluebells 
  • Buttercups
  • Cyclamen (root)
  • Daffodils/narcissus (blubs)
  • Elderberry
  • Foxglove (leaves and seeds)
  • Hyacinth (bulbs)
  • Ivy (whole plant)
  • Lupin (leaves, seeds)
  • Onion (causes anaemia)
  • Peach (stones and leaves)
  • Rhododendron
  • Rhubarb (leaves)
  • Sweetpea (stem)
  • Tulips
  • Wild cherry tree (twigs and foliage)
  • Yew (berries and foliage)

What should I do if I think my dog has been poisoned?

If you think your dog has been poisoned by anything, you need to act quickly. Contact your vet as soon as your pet shows signs of being ill.

It’s a good idea to write down the details of anything you think your dog has ingested, when they ate/drank it, how much they have swallowed, and what symptoms they have been experiencing.

If you have seen your dog eat something that they shouldn’t, don’t wait for symptoms to appear. Call your vet immediately and ask for their advice.

 

— Page last updated 03/05/2019

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